What on F is OH and OOH?

•April 24, 2017 • 1 Comment

So a big update has just gone live on the wagon front.  F coded German registered wagons are now all up to date.  I don’t think I will ever be short of weathering patterns for coal wagons.

So on with the reason behind the title of this post.  Various F coded wagons have what appears to be large letters on the right hand side of their bodies.  Due to the joys of fonts etc we shall call them OOH with a number of variations.  The longest one you see is actually O, then a filled O, then another letter, normally H.  So what do they all mean?

German registered Falns 81 80 6646 433-5 brings up the rear whilst passing through Lehrte (D) on the 12th of June 2014

German registered Falns 81 80 6646 433-5 brings up the rear whilst passing through Lehrte (D) on the 12th of June 2014

So first up, hollow ring.  This means the wagon is rated for wheel set load greater than 22.5 t

Hollow ring

Next up is a filled in ring.  This means the wagon can be used for trains of 4000 tonnes.

With just a filled ring symbol on the right hand side we have German registered Fals wagon, number 31 80 6658 007-3 passing signal boxes at Oberhausen Mathilde (D) on the 9th of May 2014

With just a filled ring symbol on the right hand side we have German registered Fals wagon, number 31 80 6658 007-3 passing signal boxes at Oberhausen Mathilde (D) on the 9th of May 2014

Next is the letter H, this means the wagon is fitted with hydraulic flap control.

With just a bodyside H symbol, German registered Falns 31 80 6641 715-1 passes Oberhausen Mathilde (D) on the 8th of May 2014

With just a bodyside H symbol, German registered Falns 31 80 6641 715-1 passes Oberhausen Mathilde (D) on the 8th of May 2014

 

The letters M & F are also used.  M means magnetic flap control whilst F means radio control.

Now I have no idea how this works, the following wagon has both magnetic and hydraulic flap control.

German registered Falns 81 80 6636 258-8 passes the western throat of Köln Gremberg yard (D) on the 7th of May 2014

German registered Falns 81 80 6636 258-8 passes the western throat of Köln Gremberg yard (D) on the 7th of May 2014

Another common variation seen on the wagon sides is O (filled) H as seen below.

German registered Falns 81 80 6646 205-7 passes the western throat of Köln Gremberg yard (D) on the 10th of October 2013

German registered Falns 81 80 6646 205-7 passes the western throat of Köln Gremberg yard (D) on the 10th of October 2013

You can also see O (hollow ring) H as well.

German registered Faals 82 80 6665 014-8 passes through Hamburg Harburg station on the 17th of July 2012.

German registered Faals 82 80 6665 014-8 passes through Hamburg Harburg station on the 17th of July 2012.

Hopefully you have learnt something in the esoteric art of wagon lettering reading this, I know I learnt some things researching this information.  If you have the urge to find out what all the other labels mean on the side of European wagons then may I suggest you head over to www.dybas.de which is one of the places I did my research for this blog post.

The next update will be the next large folder of outstanding images, the S codes.  I plan on the first update being the container wagons, followed by the steel carrying wagons.  Normally at the end of each post I list all the galleries that have been updated, this time I have decided not to seeing as every gallery in the F section was updated apart from two.

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Kit!!!

•March 12, 2017 • Leave a Comment

This update and blog post grew from a small update showing military vehicles being carried around the German network to a full blown uploading frenzy.  All of it took longer than expected after one of the cats decided to jump from a cat tree 7 foot up onto the laptop screen, shattering it.  As with any of my images, none are stored on in the computers themselves but on portable drives, with backups and backup of backups available.  If someone offered 6Tb+ of free storage in “the cloud” that accepted RAW files I would use that as well.  Suffice to say, what was meant to be a short gap between blog posts has turned into a long gap for which I apologise.

 

An earth mover allocated to the US Army (15th Engineer Battalion) / 18th Military Police Brigade) heads East through Leipzig Thekla station on board wagon Rmms 31 80 3962 442-0 on Tuesday the 9th of June 2015

An earth mover allocated to the US Army (500th Engineer Company / 15th Engineer Battalion) / 18th Military Police Brigade)  heads East through Leipzig Thekla station on board wagon Rmms 31 80 3962 442-0 on Tuesday the 9th of June 2015

 

A HEMTT (Heavy Expanded Mobility Tactical Truck), part of the 500th Engineer Company / 15th Engineer Battalion / 18th Military Police Brigade) heads East through Leipzig Thekla station on Tuesday the 9th of June 2015 on board Austrian registered wagon Rns-z 31 81 3504 084-4

A HEMTT (Heavy Expanded Mobility Tactical Truck), part of the 500th Engineer Company / 15th Engineer Battalion / 18th Military Police Brigade) heads East through Leipzig Thekla station on Tuesday the 9th of June 2015 on board Austrian registered wagon Rns-z 31 81 3504 084-4

 

Another update that happened were timber carriers, my interest in getting these uploaded was due to SudExpress releasing their version of the Laaps 565 wagon in HO 1/87.  At the same time Lilliput have released their version of the exact same timber carrier.  Nothing for ages then two at the same time.  I did ask on the Lilliput stand at the Nuremburg 2017 Toy Fair if they were using the same tooling.  Turns out they are not, according to the Lilliput representative they had planned to release the carriers a few years back but delayed when SudExpress announced their intention to release the wagons.  When SudExpress did not release the wagons then Lilliput went ahead with their release.  So with that news I promptly added the Lilliput wagons to my ever growing planned purchase list.

 

German registered timber carrier Laaps 27 80 4309 070-5 passes Dedensen/Gümmer Sportsplatz on Wednesday the 29th of April 2015

German registered timber carrier Laaps 27 80 4309 070-5 passes Dedensen/Gümmer Sportsplatz on Wednesday the 29th of April 2015.

Within the same number range of the above wagons is a different design.  The above wagon has a truss style under frame and single stanchions whilst the wagon below has a solid under frame and double stanchions and lower end supports.

 

German registered Laaps 27 80 4309 075-4 passes Leipzig Thekla (D) on Sunday the 7th of June 2015

German registered Laaps 27 80 4309 075-4 passes Leipzig Thekla (D) on Sunday the 7th of June 2015

 

The last entry for this update is one which passed through work the other Sunday, I presume due to engineering works on the Midland mainline.  This saved me having to go chasing after these wagons somewhere else in the country.

JPA VTG 81 70 9316 003-1 (European wagon designation - Uacns) passes through Rugby (GB) on Sunday the 26th of February 2017 whilst in the consist of 6Z91 11:22 Bletchley to Earls Sidings (running over 2 hours late)

JPA VTG 81 70 9316 003-1 (European wagon designation – Uacns) passes through Rugby (GB) on Sunday the 26th of February 2017 whilst in the consist of 6Z91 11:22 Bletchley to Earls Sidings (running over 2 hours late)

 

Ohh, and in case you are wondering why “Kit!!” as a title?  It was the shout used by the observers in BRIXMIS when they were line-siding in East Germany when they observed a train loaded with military equipment for which they duly took photographs and numbers of everything that passed them.  One of those things I have an interest in…

 

Austrian:

Eanos (31 81 5375), Eanos (31 81 5376), Eanos (31 81 5377), Eanos (31 81 5380), Eaos (31 81 5341)

Fans-x (33 81 6769), Fcs (21 81 6453)

Gabs (31 81 1811), Gbs (23 81 1529)

Habbiillns (31 81 2892), Habbiillns (31 81 2893), Habbiillnss (31 81 2891), Habbiins (31 81 2742), Habbiins (31 81 2743), Habbiinss (31 81 2741), Hbbillns (21 81 2458), Hbbillns (21 81 2459), Hbbills (21 81 2471), Hbbins (21 81 2470), Hbillns (21 81 2472)

Kbs (21 81 3340), Kils-tt (21 81 3380), Ks (21 81 3310), Ks (21 81 3311)

Laagss (21 81 4361), Laaprs (21 81 4395), Lgjnss (21 81 4440)

Rgs (31 81 3916), Rilns (33 81 3546), Rnoos-uz (31 81 3523), Rnooss-uz (31 81 3522), Rns (31 81 3505), Rns-z (31 81 3504), Rns-z (31 81 3506), Rns-z (31 81 3991), Ros (31 81 3925), Rs (31 81 3900), Rs (31 81 3901)

Saadkms (83 81 4983), Sdggmrss (31 81 4956), Sdgkkmss (31 81 4589), Sdgmnss (31 81 4587), Sdmmrs (83 81 4979), Sdmrrs (31 81 4935), Sggmrrss-y (31 81 4932), Sggmrs (31 81 4953), Sggmrss (31 81 4961), Sggmrss (31 81 4962), Sggrss (31 81 4960), Sgjnss (31 81 4532), Sgjss (31 81 4530), Sgnss (31 81 4552), Sgnss-y (31 81 4575), Shimmns (31 81 4668)Shimmns (31 81 4669)Shimmns (31 81 4674)Shimmns (31 81 4777)Shimmns (35 81 4673)Shimmns (35 81 4677)

Tadns (31 81 0838), Talns (81 81 0665)

Uacs (31 81 9308)

Zacens (33 81 7932), Zaces (33 81 7873), Zacns (33 81 7839), Zacns (33 81 7929), Zaens (33 81 7970), Zaes (33 81 7879)Zaes (33 81 7880)Zaes (33 81 7883)Zaes (33 81 7885), Zagkks (33 81 7914), Zans (33 81 7743)Zans (33 81 7748)Zans (33 81 7836)Zans (33 81 7837)Zans (33 81 7848)Zans (37 81 7848), Zas (33 81 7851)Zas (33 81 7853)Zas (33 81 7854)Zas (33 81 7856)

 

German:

Ealos-t (31 80 5937), Ealos-t (37 80 5946), Eamnos (37 80 5840), Eanos (37 80 5375), Eanos (37 80 5376), Eanos (37 80 5377), Eanos (37 80 5932), Eanos(-x) (31 80 5375), Eanos-x (31 80 5376), Eanos-x (31 80 5377), Eans (31 80 5419), Eaos (31 80 5341), Eaos (31 80 5343), Eaos (31 80 5344), Eaos (31 80 5345), Eaos (33 80 5342), Eaos (37 80 5302), Eaos (37 80 5330), Eaos (37 80 5336), Eaos (37 80 5358), Eaos-x (31 80 5330), Eaos-x (31 80 5358), Eaos-x (31 80 5359), Eaos-x (31 80 5360), Eaos-x (31 80 5368), Eaos-x (31 80 5369), Eaos-x (31 80 5400), Eaos-x (31 80 5403), Eas-x (31 80 5423), Eas (-x) (31 80 5420)Eas (-x) (31 80 5425)Eas-x (31 80 5426), Eas-x (31 80 5949)Es (21 80 5543).

Laaps (27 80 4309)

Samms (31 80 4865), Salmms (33 80 4816), SSy (33 80 3994)

Rmms (31 80 3960)Rmms (31 80 3961)Rmms (31 80 3962)Rmms (31 80 3964), Rs (31 80 3905)Rs (31 80 3907)Rs (31 80 3908)Rs (31 80 3909)Rs (31 80 3913)Rs (31 80 3914)

 

United Kingdom:

JPA VTG (Uacns) 81 70 9316

I have an addiction

•September 27, 2016 • Leave a Comment

Hi, my name is Andy and I have an addiction.  For some reason I like certain red and yellow vehicles on the German rail network.  Just like I can not rationally explain why I like to photograph trains I can neither explain why I really like DB breakdown and recovery trains or the DB Netz fleet of track recorders etc.  So if it is involved in making sure things don’t break, or involved in clearing up the aftermath when things have gone wrong then I have a fascination with it.  Yes, I am weird.

After another spring and summer pushing the limits of how many times one can go abroad on holiday without the better half and not find myself single it is now time to start sorting out the images and getting them shared and uploaded.  I am reasonably on top of the locomotive images but I am currently two years behind with the wagon images, whilst the coaching stock and miscellaneous images have never been uploaded at all.  To feed the addiction when I am not in Germany I am slowly but surely building up a fleet of said vehicles for my HO European layout which is currently under construction.  The visits and modelling join up when I need detail images of projects currently on my workbench.  This summer I was able to feed both monsters at the same time so I figured it was about time I got the images uploaded.

The first image is one of two vehicles I have a fascination with.

Class 716 Snowblower, number 716 002-1 sits at Fulda (D) on the 25th of October 2014

Class 716 Snowblower, number 716 002-1 sits at Fulda (D) on the 25th of October 2014

The Class 716 Snowblower fleet comprises of two vehicles.  They were built in 1994 to serve the Hannover to Würzburg high speed line but are now utilised across the German rail network.  They have the ability to clear 16,000 tons of snow per hour, throwing the snow 40 metres from the track.  The vehicle body can raise up and spin round 180 degrees.  The model company Roco released a model of 716 003-9 (Article number 72802 for DC) and since its release I have wanted one.  It’s been like an itch I could not scratch as the recommend retail price was a mere.. 519,00€.  With the best will in the world, get stuffed.  I am not going to pay that sort of money for a model that mainly sits in a siding.  The price now has been dropped down to 349,00€ which was tempting but still a no go.  Earlier this month one came available from a dealer I have used before for a greatly reduced price.  The model is fully DCC, sound fitted, and even lifts up and spins 180 degrees just like the real thing.  Now I realise these “one offs” cost some serious money to produce but why not sell them without all the electrical wizardry as well.  A classic (in my mind) example of this is Trix item number 23540.  A DCC fitted, operating “Goliath” crane, yours for the minor sum of 999,00€ RRP.  I am no longer nine, therefore the need to have a crane which picks up the train I have derailed is no longer required.  I wouldn’t mind a crane that can sit in a siding, and once in a while get hauled around the layout though.  Based on that, why not sell the crane without the DCC special stuff.  You have the moulds, make use of them.  Whilst I am on this little mini-rant,  paint it in red as well so I can have an excuse to buy it.  This leads me nicely onto my next photo, no, not a Goliath crane but its replacements, the Kirow Taskmaster 910 & the Kirow Taskmaster 1200.

Emergency Crane Kirow Multitasker 910, number 99 80 9471 005-5 sits at Fulda (D) on the 24th of April 2016

Emergency Crane Kirow Multitasker 910, number 99 80 9471 005-5 sits at Fulda (D) on the 24th of April 2016

 

Emergency Crane Kirow Multitasker 1200 , number 99 80 9471 003-0 (723 003) sits at Wanna-Eickel (D) on the 23rd of August 2016

Emergency Crane Kirow Multitasker 1200 , number 99 80 9471 003-0 (732 003) sits at Wanna-Eickel (D) on the 23rd of August 2016

Three of the KRC1200 have been ordered and delivered.  Their home stabling points being Fulda, Leipzig and Wanna-Eickel.  Typically every time I had been to Fulda I had missed the KRC1200 but was able to photograph the KRC910.  The two KRC910s are based at Fulda and Wanna-Eickel.  Why the interest between the two cranes? Well I have a kit of the KRC1200 to build in the very near future and I wanted to get some decent shots of it to assist me with detailing the model.  Both of the cranes can either be hauled (100km/h) or they can self-propel (19km/h).  As previously stated, I have no need for a crane boom that goes up and down, nor for it to crawl along on its own so a kit is perfect for me.  I get the looks but no requirement for all the electrical trickery.

The cranes are supported with converted “Res” wagons, used for carrying the boom and other associated tools.

Materialwagen for KRC1200 732 003 (99 80 9471 003-0), number 99 80 9370 072-7 sits at Wanna-Eickel (D) on the 23rd of August 2016

Materialwagen for KRC1200 732 003 (99 80 9471 003-0), number 99 80 9370 072-7 sits at Wanna-Eickel (D) on the 23rd of August 2016

I currently have two of these vehicles stripped on my workbench ready for conversion, with more work planned on them tomorrow when I get a delivery of some plasticard.  A question for someone who may know.  What is the metal vessel in front of the red container? It has warning symbols etc on it.  I only ask as if I know what it is I can see if anyone makes one in HO scale already, therefore saving me time scratch building it.

The other vehicle associated with the KRC1200 is the counterweight wagon.  I have no idea of the history of this wagon.  From the way the frame is formed my brain says an ex tank wagon of some description but I have yet to find a donor vehicle for this.  Then again, it might be a brand new wagon in which case I have two options.  Write to Kirow and ask if they have any plans or go back to Wanna-Eickel with a tape measure.  This wagon might go down as a “long term project”, and we all know how they turn out.

Gegenlastwagen for KRC1200 732 003 (99 80 9471 003-0), number 99 80 9377 003-5 sits at Wanna-Eickel (D) on the 23rd of August 2016

Gegenlastwagen for KRC1200 732 003 (99 80 9471 003-0), number 99 80 9377 003-5 sits at Wanna-Eickel (D) on the 23rd of August 2016

Normally I would list every gallery I have uploaded but this time, everything in the Miscellaneous section is new, so feel free to follow the link and have a browse of the weird and wonderful special vehicles that run over the DB network.

Germany:

Miscellaneous

Back to blighty

•May 24, 2016 • Leave a Comment

Time for a British update.  Yes, you read that correctly.  I have uploaded images from the United Kingdom for once.  It stemmed from some new wagons passing through Rugby recently whilst at work and culminated in me travelling to York via the East Coast Main Line.  Why York? I gave myself many excuses as to why but eventually it comes down to the simple reason of “because I could”.

On the 15th of April 2016 GBRf 66749 heads North through Rugby (GB) with train 6Z66 the 10:48 hours service from Wembley Yard to Long Marston hauling 26 brand new JNA (Ealnos) wagons with Ermewa branding (GB-ERSA).  These wagons had arrived from mainland Europe via the Tunnel but have been placed directly into secure storage at Long Marston awaiting their contracted use later this year.

 

66749_b_6Z66_Rugby_GB_15042016

66 749 passes through Rugby (GB) whilst working 6Z66 10:48 Wembley Yard to Long Marston on the 15th of April 2016.

A different batch of JNA (Ealnos) 81 70 5500 have the Ermewa (GB-ERSA) branding plus Tarmac branding on the opposite corner.  These wagons are in use already as can be seen from the photograph below.

81705500014-2_a_JNA_Ealnos_6B30_Rugby_GB_08032016

81 70 5500 014-2, TOPS Code JNA (Ealnos) passes South through Rugby (GB) in the consist of 6B30 12:55 hours from Mountsorrel to Northampton Sidings on the 8th of March 2016.

 

Whilst being at work I have been rather lucky to get shots of most of the new wagons to the United Kingdom, a few types have escaped me.  Another new one to pass through has been the MMA (Ealnos) which is in service with DB Cargo (what was DB Schenker). Whilst in the same number range as the above 81 70 5500 for Tarmac etc there are differences.

81705500103-3_a_MMA_Ealnos_6Z11_Rugby_GB_09052016

MMA (Ealnos) 81 70 5500 103-3 heads South through Rugby (GB) in the consist of the 10:00 hours from Brigg sidings to Southampton Up Yard on the 9th of May 2016.

Another new-ish set for DB Cargo are these rebuilt steel wagons.  The steel industry within the United Kingdom in decline (though some specialist services are doing well) there is a glut of wagons sat around with no work for them.  The answer? Slap a box on the frame and hey presto, infrastructure projects for Network Rail suddenly have long wheel-based bogie wagons.  These wagons are odd in that they have both their old number and a new European standard.  On TOPS (the UK industry system for tracking stock movements etc) the old number is in use.

82704703070-1_950178_a_MXA_Sms_7R03_Rugby_GB_15052016

MXA 950178 also known as Sms 82 70 4703 070-1 passes through Rugby (GB) in the consist of engineering train 7R03 08:00 hours from Denbigh Hall North Junction to Bescot Engineering Sidings on the 15th of May 2016

Another new wagon through Rugby recently were these TOPS coded JGA (Uacns), also owned by Ermewa (GB-ERSA) with Tarmac branding.

 

81707829000-1_a_JGA_Uacns_6Z11_Rugby_GB_09052016

JGA (Uacns) 81 70 7829 000-1 passes through Rugby with train 6Z11 the 13:18 hours from Wembley Yard to Tunstead on the 11th May 2016.

So going back to the start of this post, I gave myself a number of excuses to travel to York, one of which was the opportunity to view GBRf 66 779, the last Class 66 to be built for the European market.  To celebrate this, GBRf arranged for the locomotive to be released in a livery known as BR Lined Green, which is the same livery the last steam locomotive to be built by British Rail, BR Standard Class 9F, 92220 ‘Evening Star’ resides in.  At a naming ceremony within the Great Hall of the National Railway Museum at York on the 10th of May 2016, 66 779 was named Evening Star.  GBRf have announced 66 779 will be donated to the National Railway Museum National Heritage Committee at the end of its working life.  The opportunity to photograph both of them together will not happen again in theory for a long time.  Considering the first Class 66 arrived in the United Kingdom in 1998 (18 years ago) and is still going strong I might be in my grave before 66 779 joins 92220 in the Great Hall.

66779_p_York_NRM_GB_17052016

GBRf 66779 ‘Evening Star’ sits next to BR Standard 9F, 92220 ‘Evening Star’ within the Great Hall at the National Railway Museum in York on the 17th of May 2016

 

After photographing the Class 66 & 9F at York I decided to pop over to Barnetby, via Doncaster to photograph some Biomass wagons which I hadn’t had the chance to photograph until now.  When I arrived at Doncaster I found the wagon below sitting in Doncaster station yard.  The last time I photographed this wagon it was surrounded by the dreaded buddleia, looking like it had reached the end of its working life.

FBA_600021_b_Doncaster_GB_17052016

FBA 600021 sits in ex-works condition in the station yard at Doncaster (GB) on the 17th of May 2016

The last image in this blog post is the very colourful, and I have to say, very smart looking Biomass wagons serving Drax power station, built by WH Davis.  They are listed on TOPS as IIA, in line with all new wagon builds they have been given a European identity of ‘Tafoos’

83700698055-6_a_IIA_Tafoos_a_4R51_Barnetby_GB_17052016

IIA (Tafoos) 83 70 0698 055-6 heads East through Barnetby (GB) towards the coast in the consist of train 4R51 the 11:45 hours from Drax Power Station to Immingham Dock on the 17th of May 2016

 

United Kingdom Locomotives:

Class 66/7

United Kingdom Wagons:

FBAIIA (Tafoos), JGA (Uacns), JNA (Ealnos), MMA (Ealnos), MXA (Sms), TEA (Zafgns)

 

Let it snow…

•April 3, 2016 • Leave a Comment

Since my last update and blog entry I’ve been busy, with a short trip to mainland Europe taken plus a lot of photo processing going on in the background.  This update covers the remaining German E-loks, with some sorting out concerning how best to break down the Class 189 (ES64F4) locomotives.  I’ve also updated the Austrian and Italian locomotives section, with shots from the first trip this year.

As a deal with the better half last year who commented that I had spent a fair amount of time abroad in 2014 I agreed to take less trips but slightly longer duration in 2015 with the caveat I would go across to the European mainland at the start of the year to chase down some snow shots I had been promising myself.  The original intention had been to go across in January but for reasons which now escape me I decided to wait till February.  I of course then spent January cursing as some lovely shots of locomotives passing through snow but with the sun out were posted online by others.  When February came I spent the time leading up to my trip scouring the internet for snow forecasts , with some suggesting I was going to have snow in Münich and some decent snow in other locations.  In reality it did not happen that way but I did get to photograph some locomotives in the snow on the Austrian/Italian border at Brenner.

Austrian registered 1216 016-6 departs South from Brenner on the Austrian / Italian border with EC81 07:38 München Hbf to Bologna on Tuesday 16th of February 2016.

Austrian registered 1216 016-6 departs South from Brenner on the Austrian / Italian border with EC81 07:38 München Hbf to Bologna on Tuesday 16th of February 2016.

 

Being on the Austrian/Italian border I of got to photograph some Italian registered locomotives.  The location itself I would have happily stayed at for longer but when the snow is falling and the temperature is registering somewhere around -10 ºC, the joy slowly seeps out of you, no matter how much you like the hobby.  Also knowing there is a train once every two hours back to Germany, and on the train is a warm bar serving beer and food, then the decision becomes easier as to whether to go or stay.

Italian registered 412 013-1 and 412 017-2 arrive at Brenner station from Italy with an Intermodal service on Tuesday the 16th of February 2016.

Italian registered 412 013-1 and 412 017-2 arrive at Brenner station from Italy with an Intermodal service on Tuesday the 16th of February 2016.

As mentioned at the start of this post I have changed around how I showed the German Class 189 (ES64F4) locomotives.  I did have them split into four sections but these were getting unwieldy and confusing, too me at least.  I have decided to now split them between “packages” carried.  The Siemens ES64F4 makes a very good effort to be a locomotive available for use across all of mainland Europe.  The locomotive can carry the four main pantographs for picking up  power across mainland Europe (15kV AC, 25kV AC, 1.5kV DC & 3kV DC), it also has a variable LED lighting system which allows it to show the required lighting set up of each country.  The packages cover the various train control and safety systems of the countries concerned.

189 822-0 (VE) liveried up and on hire to Steiermarkbahn Transport and Logistik GmbH heads East away from Würzburg with a loaded Timber train whilst working DGS81346 Freigburg (Saxony) to Augsburg on Friday the 5th June 2015

189 822-0 (VE) liveried up and on hire to Steiermarkbahn Transport and Logistik GmbH heads East away from Würzburg with a loaded Timber train whilst working DGS81346 Freigburg (Saxony) to Augsburg on Friday the 5th June 2015

 

My next update will cover German diesels which should be my last set of updates before my next trip out to Germany later this month.

Galleries updated:

Austrian Locomotives:

Class 185, Class 1016, Class 1116, Class 1142, Class 1144, Class 1216, Class 2016, Class 2062, Class 2070

 

German Locomotives:

Class 150 (E50), Class 151, Class 152, Class 155, Class 156, Class 180, Class 181, Class 182, Class 183, Class 185 (AC1), Class 185 (AC2), Class 186, Class 187, Class 188 (E94), Class 189 (VA), Class 189 (VB), Class 189 (VB2), Class 189 (VD), Class 189 (VE), Class 189 (VH), Class 189 (VJ), Class 189 (VK), Class 189 (VL), Class 189 (VM), Class 189 (VO), Class 193

 

Italian Locomotives:

Class D.245, Class E.402, Class E.405, Class E.412, Class E.464, Class E.483RTC EU43

Evolution..

•February 21, 2016 • Leave a Comment

Last year I had the pleasure of revisiting Leipzig railway station, it had been a mere 24 years since I had last been there so things had changed.  The huge train shed roof is still there but a number of the platforms have been removed or are being used for other things.  One of the platforms is now used to exhibit some retired locomotives and rolling stock.

The E44 series of locomotives were first built in 1932 and were the first electric locomotives on the German rail network. E44 046, pictured below, was built in 1936 and has held a number of identities during its 80 years in existence.  From being known as E44 046, through to 244 046-9, 188 445-1, and back to E44 046.

E44 046 (144 046-0) sits under the massive roof of Leipzig Hbf, Germany on the the 8th of June 2015

E44 046 (144 046-0) sits under the massive roof of Leipzig Hbf, Germany on the the 8th of June 2015

 

The replacement for the E44 series of locomotives were the E10 series of locomotives.  They were built from 1956 onwards, as part of the standardised electric locomotive program.  The idea was a standard locomotive would be built for all types of traffic.  It was soon realised this was not possible so the development program split off into a number of branches.  The E10 series, which was to be used on express passenger services, the E41 series for local passenger trains and the E40 series for freight services.  Nowadays we know them by a different series numbers but they are still the same locomotives that came out of the factory in the 50s and 60s.  The E10 is what we know as the Class 115.

115 346-9 sits at München Hbf, Germany after hauling in the stock for CNL 485 (Munich- Rome) overnight sleeper service on the 6th of October 2014

115 346-9 sits at München Hbf, Germany after hauling in the stock for CNL 485 (Munich- Rome) overnight sleeper service on the 6th of October 2014

 

The E40 series of locomotives are now known as the Class 110, Class 139 & Class 140 and can still be seen on freight services and stock moves.  The class 140s have found favour with many private operators around Germany, and can be found in a multitude of liveries apart from DB red. According to my browsing on the web the E41 series now only exist as museum/preserved locomotives.  The exception being E41 161 (141 161-0) which in 2005 was sold to DB Netz as a training locomotive and was last noted at Fulda.  Whether it is still there, no idea, one I shall have to look out for, hidden behind the cranes and rescue trains.

140 845-9 D-PRESS (140 008-6) heads West towards Magdeburg Hbf with a block train of ARS Altmann car carriers on the 11th of June 2015

140 845-9 D-PRESS (140 008-6) heads West towards Magdeburg Hbf with a block train of ARS Altmann car carriers on the 11th of June 2015

So there you have it, the evolution of electric locomotives in Germany, from 1932 to the present day operations.

Galleries updated:

Germany:

Class 111, Class 112, Class 114, Class 115, Class 120, Class 127, Class 139, Class 140, Class 142, Class 143, Class 144 (E44), Class 145

To Europe..

•February 11, 2016 • Leave a Comment

Many years ago there was a dream by those in charge, both political and on the railways.  The dream was you could board a train in Swansea, Glasgow or London (other starting points were available), travel overnight, and awaken in Paris, Brussels or even further afield in Frankfurt, Cologne and Dortmund on a service named NightStar.  That dream was never realised, which is a shame, because every time I pass through the London St Pancras area in the evening when in London I truly wish I had just had dinner, washed down with a couple of pints and my next move is to step under Barlows magnificently restored train shed roof and board a sleeper to Cologne.  Low cost airlines, shifting goalposts and many other reasons conspired to undermine the viability of overnight travel through the tunnel into mainland Europe.  I would love it for this to become viable but alas I fear that time has passed, and even though I am young (comparatively) I will never get the chance to see that dream become reality.

When the Eurostar service was introduced, the trains departed from London Waterloo International. The roof of that station is an impressive feature in itself but in my opinion it is nothing compared to the refurbished train shed designed by William Henry Barlow, and completed in 1868.  There are some very impressive stations around the world and when you step off the train at London St Pancras International and look up, it compares with the best.  Alas, the same can’t be said for the newly extended domestic platforms, but the less said about that, the better.

Eurostar 3733108 (3108) sits at London St Pancras International awaiting its next duty to Mainland Europe on the 10th of May 2014

Eurostar 373 108 (3108) sits at London St Pancras International awaiting its next duty to Mainland Europe on the 10th of May 2014

The Eurostar sets themselves are numbered to denote a time when they were expected to work to other destinations in the United Kingdom apart from London, plus to show who “owns” the set.  The 373 33xx series of Eurostar sets were created to be the North of London (NoL) trains, these were formed of 8 cars per half set, instead of the normal 10 cars per half set as found on the 373 30xx / 373 31xx & 373 32xx series Eurostars (also known as the 3 Capitals sets).

373 008 (3008) in original Eurostar livery sits at Ashford International station with a service heading towards mainland Europe on the 26th of July 2007.

373 008 (3008) in original Eurostar livery sits at Ashford International station with a service heading towards mainland Europe on the 26th of July 2007.

The Eurostar sets are currently undergoing a delayed mid-life refurbishment program.  The program was initially slated to start in 2012, having been announced back in 2008.  The first refurbished set actually came back into traffic in the summer of 2015.

373 016 (3016) in its refurbished livery sits at London St Pancras International station on the 11th December 2015 having just arrived with train number 9161, the 19:52 Brussels Midi to London St Pancras International service.

373 016 (3016) in its refurbished livery sits at London St Pancras International station on the 11th December 2015 having just arrived with train number 9161, the 19:52 Brussels Midi to London St Pancras International service.

 

USB plug installed along with power supply socket on a refurbished Class 373 (e300 Eurostar) set.

USB plug installed along with power supply socket on a refurbished Class 373 (e300 Eurostar) set.

In the Standard Premier/Business Premier seating coaches on the refurbished sets Eurostar have installed a USB plug for charging electronic devices.  Still no wi-fi but the 3G/4G connection on the line of route, including the tunnel itself is pretty good.  Of course, I would prefer free wi-fi but going from memory I believe the Class 373s will not have wi-fi installed but the Class 374 (e320 Velaro) will have it installed.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Going back to the start of this post, talking about overnight services from the United Kingdom to mainland Europe, work was started on the rolling stock before everything was put on hold, and then eventually scrapped.  A number of redundant of Mark 3 Sleeper coaches were transformed into generator coaches to provide electrical train power for the services that would serve non-electrified routes (Plymouth & Swansea).  Five coaches were transformed before the program was halted.

Nightstar Generator Coach, number 96373 (AX5G) sits unused in storage Long Marston, England on the 8th of August 2010.

Still carrying its Channel Tunnel roundels, and branded EPS (European Passenger Services) at the other end, NightStar Generator Coach, number 96373 (AX5G) sits unused in storage Long Marston, England on the 8th of August 2010.

Galleries updated:

Great Britain:

Class 373 (Eurostar), Mk3 AX5G (NightStar Generator Coach)