Evolution..

Last year I had the pleasure of revisiting Leipzig railway station, it had been a mere 24 years since I had last been there so things had changed.  The huge train shed roof is still there but a number of the platforms have been removed or are being used for other things.  One of the platforms is now used to exhibit some retired locomotives and rolling stock.

The E44 series of locomotives were first built in 1932 and were the first electric locomotives on the German rail network. E44 046, pictured below, was built in 1936 and has held a number of identities during its 80 years in existence.  From being known as E44 046, through to 244 046-9, 188 445-1, and back to E44 046.

E44 046 (144 046-0) sits under the massive roof of Leipzig Hbf, Germany on the the 8th of June 2015

E44 046 (144 046-0) sits under the massive roof of Leipzig Hbf, Germany on the the 8th of June 2015

 

The replacement for the E44 series of locomotives were the E10 series of locomotives.  They were built from 1956 onwards, as part of the standardised electric locomotive program.  The idea was a standard locomotive would be built for all types of traffic.  It was soon realised this was not possible so the development program split off into a number of branches.  The E10 series, which was to be used on express passenger services, the E41 series for local passenger trains and the E40 series for freight services.  Nowadays we know them by a different series numbers but they are still the same locomotives that came out of the factory in the 50s and 60s.  The E10 is what we know as the Class 115.

115 346-9 sits at München Hbf, Germany after hauling in the stock for CNL 485 (Munich- Rome) overnight sleeper service on the 6th of October 2014

115 346-9 sits at München Hbf, Germany after hauling in the stock for CNL 485 (Munich- Rome) overnight sleeper service on the 6th of October 2014

 

The E40 series of locomotives are now known as the Class 110, Class 139 & Class 140 and can still be seen on freight services and stock moves.  The class 140s have found favour with many private operators around Germany, and can be found in a multitude of liveries apart from DB red. According to my browsing on the web the E41 series now only exist as museum/preserved locomotives.  The exception being E41 161 (141 161-0) which in 2005 was sold to DB Netz as a training locomotive and was last noted at Fulda.  Whether it is still there, no idea, one I shall have to look out for, hidden behind the cranes and rescue trains.

140 845-9 D-PRESS (140 008-6) heads West towards Magdeburg Hbf with a block train of ARS Altmann car carriers on the 11th of June 2015

140 845-9 D-PRESS (140 008-6) heads West towards Magdeburg Hbf with a block train of ARS Altmann car carriers on the 11th of June 2015

So there you have it, the evolution of electric locomotives in Germany, from 1932 to the present day operations.

Galleries updated:

Germany:

Class 111, Class 112, Class 114, Class 115, Class 120, Class 127, Class 139, Class 140, Class 142, Class 143, Class 144 (E44), Class 145

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~ by gingespotting on February 21, 2016.

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